Equalities statement

  1. The Academy’s Aims and Values

At The Kingston Academy we continuously strive to ensure that everyone is treated with respect and dignity.  Every person in our school is given fair and equal opportunities to develop their full potential regardless of their gender, ethnicity, cultural and religious background, sexuality, disability or special educational needs and ability.

The Academy works actively to promote equality and foster positive attitudes and commitment to an education for equality.

We do this by:

  • treating all those within the school community (pupils, staff, trustees and parents) as individuals with their own particular abilities, beliefs, challenges, attitudes, background and experience;
  • challenging stereotypical views and learning to value each other’s differences through assemblies, Aspire-SMART, PSHE and the Philosophy and Ethics curriculum;
  • creating and maintaining a school ethos which promotes equality, develops understanding and challenges myths, stereotypes, misconceptions and prejudices;
  • encouraging everyone in our school community to gain a positive self image and high self esteem;
  • having high expectations of everyone involved with the whole school community;
  • promoting mutual respect and valuing each other’s similarities and differences and facing equality issues openly and honestly;
  • identifying, challenging and removing all behaviours, practices, procedures and customs which are discriminatory and replacing them with practices that are fair to all;
  • monitoring evaluating and reviewing all the above to secure continuous improvement in all that we do.

2 Equality at The Kingston Academy

2.1 The Kingston Academy is aware of its responsibilities under the Equality Act 2010, and of our Public Sector Equality Duty introduced by the Act,  which extends to certain protected characteristics:

  • Sex
  • Race
  • Disability
  • Religion or belief
  • Sexual orientation
  • Gender reassignment
  • Marriage and civil partnership
  • Pregnancy and maternity
  • Age (a relevant characteristic in considering duties in our role as an employer but not in relation to pupils).

2.2 The Act gives us three general duties:

  • to eliminate discrimination, harassment, victimisation and any other conduct that is prohibited by or under this Act;
  • to advance equality of opportunity between persons who share a relevant protected characteristic and persons who do not share it;
  • to foster good relations between persons who share a relevant protected characteristic and persons who do not share it.

All of our trustees and staff are made aware of the need to have due regard to these general duties when making a significant decision (including the development of policies) and to assess whether it may have particular implications for people with particular protected characteristics.

2.3 We also have two specific duties:

a. To publish information which shows we have due regard for equalities, as defined by the Act; and

b.To publish at least one equality objective every four years. This should be specific and measurable and further the aims of the equality duty.

 

3. Examples and evidence of how we are meeting each of the three elements of the Public Sector Equality Duty:

3.1 Eliminating discrimination

  • Reflected in our Behaviour and Anti-Bullying policies (copies published on our website).
  • The Public Sector Equality Duty is referenced in the Terms of Reference for each of the Trust’s committees and details are annexed in full. Trustees are aware of their duty to consider equalities when taking decisions, and equalities monitoring is carried out, for example in recruitment and following pay reviews. Trustees are aware of their duty to consider equalities when taking decisions and when holding the school to account, for example the need to work to challenge gender stereotypes through careers guidance and education was discussed at the Curriculum Performance and Standards Committee (March 2018).
  • An assembly in January 2018 and subsequent Aspire SMART sessions focused on Face Equality, to highlight discrimination faced by individuals with disfigurements, and also the appearance-based teasing that is rife in many settings.

3.2 Advancing equality of opportunity

  • We use attainment data to assess how pupils with different characteristics are performing.
  • We identify and address barriers to the participation of particular groups in learning and enrichment activities.
  • We ensure the inclusion of positive, non-stereotypical images of women and men/girls and boys across the curriculum and in displays around the school.

 

  • 2017/18 We have a comprehensive SEND training programme for staff, for example all staff received ADHD training in January 2018 delivered by the SENCo and Finton O’Regan, an ADHD specialist has been booked to follow this up with a training session for all staff on De-escalating Conflict and Managing Challenging Behaviour in the Classroom in June 2018.
  • February 2018: We have reviewed our behaviour policy (see copy on our website) and introduced a new differentiated response consequence. All SEND pupils now complete differentiated detentions that are appropriate to them and their needs, led by a member of the Inclusion Team.
  • March 2018: We have also strengthened the equalities provisions in our trips policy (see copy on our website).
  • On International Women’s Day March 2018 a group of 32 year 8 pupils visited the National Portrait Gallery to meet journalist, writer and activities Bee Rowlatt. Bee discussed her research on the pioneering feminist Mary Wollstonecraft, telling stories of her life and work. She invited the pupils to join her in her campaign to raise awareness of Wollstonecraft’s life by erecting a statue in her honour (Campaign for Mary). Pupils then spent time in the galleries with TKA Art and History Lead teachers, discussing women’s suffrage amongst a special exhibition ‘Votes for Women’. This was particularly special given this is the centenary of votes for women. Pupil Ophelia (Y8) commented “We really enjoyed the trip and were truly inspired.”
  • TKA Art and History leads attended a teacher’s seminar at the National Portrait Gallery as part of the celebrations of Vote 100. Prior to attending, a group of male and female pupils who had previously attended a lecture at the National Portrait Gallery by Leyla Hussein were invited to discuss their thoughts on gender equality. Their sound bites were read out as part of the event in London, including: “Girls just want to be equal. At school, we learn through International Women’s day, but it is not up to the school, or something the school can affect; equality comes from the person and what they believe in.” (Georgia Y9)

 

  • 2016/17 We engaged with people who have special knowledge including Sarah Herbert, Achieving for Children’s Lead Educational Advisor for SEND and Hannah Webber Lead Advisor for ASD and we have provided bespoke staff training on the needs of our SEND pupils relating to dyslexia, ASD, and are raising staff awareness of emotional intelligence.
  • On International Women’s Day March 2017 Leyla Hussein (founder of the Dahlia project) spoke to pupils about Female Genital Mutilation and oppression experienced by women and girls around the world “Leyla is very inspirational and we enjoyed listening to her views since she has experienced oppression and FGM” Callum Year 8 Pupils also discussed the special exhibition ‘Speak Its Name’ which explored gender, identity and LGBT+ history during the visit, seeing portraits of famous LGBT+ celebrities such as Saffron Burrows and Tom Daley.

 

3.3 Fostering good relations

  • Our curriculum promotes tolerance and friendship, and the understanding of a range of religions and cultures, for example through PSHE and Philosophy and Ethics and promotes and supports pupils to be accepting of one another’s lifestyles and beliefs.
  • The curriculum is supported by resources that reflect the diverse communities of modern Britain.
  • Speakers at school assemblies have promoted positive images of equality, including a Paralympic gold medalist (2016/17).
  • METRO, a leading equality and diversity charity presented an assembly and delivered workshops for pupils during Cultural Week in March 2017 on issues relating to sexuality, identity, gender and diversity
  • Displays around the school promote positive images of equality.
  • The school holds an annual Cultural Week which promotes the diverse backgrounds of pupils. Throughout the week there are workshops that take place which include the Japanese Society delivering classes on calligraphy, manga art and origami.
  • Should any tensions arise between different groups of pupils within the school we will put in place initiatives to address this.
  1. Our Equality Objectives and how we are working towards them:

4.1 Encouraging girls to consider STEM related career options:

2017/18

The SPARK programme has continued (see below) and in addition:

  • A group of year 7/8 female pupils have joined the Institute of Physics Science Ambassadors Scheme, aiming to encourage girls to progress on to Science (particularly Physics) A Levels. They have received training from the Institute of Physics in March 2018 and will begin delivering outreach sessions soon.
  • TKA is part of the Institute of Physics’ Whole School Equality Programme. A member of staff has received comprehensive training as the school’s “Gender Champion” in February 2018. The programme will involve the Gender Champion working with the Senior Leadership Team, other staff and pupils to gain a “whole school” picture of gender equality at TKA and work on possible improvements. Baseline data is currently being gathered. All staff at TKA will be receiving unconscious bias training as part of their CPD in June 2018 (this CPD will also be open to staff from other local schools).

2016/17

  • The SPARK programme of STEM immersion experiences to encourage girls to consider STEM careers commenced with a group of 15 high prior attaining girls from TKA and girls from two local primaries Latchmere and Fern Hill participating in a STEM outreach trip to Homerton College, Cambridge. “The girls from TKA acted as mentors for the girls in Year 5 which meant we guided the younger pupils to encourage them to enjoy STEM subjects (Science, Technology, Engineering and Maths)…The SPARK programme was definitely a success with my buddy because she said that she wanted to do something with STEM in the future; this was nice to hear as it was the whole point of the project. I would like to be a physiotherapist and this trip has made me realise how important it is to go to university.” Megan Yr 7.

This was followed by a workshop which focussed on the architectural design process and was run by Elliott Wood consulting (structural and civil engineers) and A Studio architects, who have been working on the school’s new building design. “I enjoyed today because it inspired me and made me think what it would like to be an architect.” Latchmere Yr 5 pupil.

Pupils worked with with Barclay Homes looking at the conversion of a local building Latchmere House, solved Maths problems at Bletchley Park and visited  Google headquarters. 2017/18: The programme has now continued into its second year.

  • April 2017: A team of Y7 and Y8 girls participated in the Salters’ Festival of Chemistry at Imperial College on 25/4/17, designed to improve understanding of practical chemistry in a forensic science context
  • June 2017 a group of Year 7 girls attended a Science workshop at Imperial College, looking at how underrepresented women in science are in Wikipedia and helping to create new Wikipedia pages.

2015/16

  • In May 2016 all TKA girls were involved in a workshop called ‘People Like Me’ which was delivered by Alex Farrer, AfC Science Consultant (and now TKA Scientist in Residence). The aim of the workshop was to get girls thinking about possible STEM career pathways by matching up their own personality traits with different STEM careers. The ‘People Like Me’ programme has been designed by WISE (a campaign group whose mission statement is to promote women in science, technology and engineering), and the activities are specifically targeted at Y7 girls (this is the optimum age to engage girls in thinking about STEM career pathways based on research carried out by WISE).
  • The workshop was followed up by an evening workshop for Y7 girls and significant adult females in their lives, with the intention of consolidating ideas delivered. It was attended by 20 pupils and 20 significant adult females and the feedback from both groups was overwhelmingly positive about the programme.

4.2 Improving outcomes and diminishing differences for disadvantaged White British Boys:

When the school first opened in 2015, improving outcomes and diminishing differences for disadvantaged White British Boys was adopted as an equalities objective because it is a London wide priority. However, outcomes for this group at The Kingston Academy are generally strong and have not been identified as an issue. The school will remain vigilant but this is no longer an equality objective.

2016/17: Steps taken to support the literacy of White British Boys:

  • A Parent Reader programme targets White British boys who have low reading ages;
  • We have targeted the use of the Pupil Premium: Kindles are to be offered to selected Pupil Premium White British Boys to support independent reading;
  • Aspire SMART writing sessions for Y8 focus on writing skills across the curriculum;
  • All Y7 pupils have had access to Tudor Drive library in December;
  • A House Reading buddy system pairs Y7 and Y8 pupils to read aloud every week;
  • All staff have received literacy CPLD.

This Statement will be reviewed annually by a member of the Senior Leadership Team and by the Kingston Educational Trust.  The next review is due in March 2019.

Approved by the Kingston Educational Trust on 26 March 2018.